Wildlife photographer to speak regarding grassland grouse conservation

Noppadol Paothong, a wildlife photographer, is scheduled talk about conservation, grouse as well as the tales behind the snaps in his book named Save the Last Dance, in a presentation all set at the University of Wyoming for next week. The book named Save the Last Dance: A Story of North American Grassland Grouse was published in the year 2012. It deals with the courtship rituals of grouse species which live in grassland habitats of North American. He is scheduled to speak on Thursday at 7 pm at UW Ag Auditorium.
Paothong, a Missouri Department of Conservation photographer, spent eleven years taking snaps of  sharp tailed grouse, lesser prairie chickens, Gunnison sage grouse and greater sage grouse. Since the courtship season for every bird species lasts only a few weeks in the spring, Noppadol could take snap only 1 – 2 species every year. In compiling snaps for the book, he toured 80000 miles through fourteen states. He spent several hours at a time sitting in blinds and waiting for the absolute right time, braving all types of types of hazardous terrain and weather.
Paothong, Thailand native, came to the United States twenty one years ago to attend college. In the year 2001, he was working as a photojournalist on assignment to lick snaps of prairie chickens, when he developed a passion for the wildlife and bird photography. He stated that so just few people know regarding these birds.
While seeing a prairie chicken, he saw a bird which was rare, beautiful and unique. It was one of just few birds left in Missouri. They are highly threatened by their habitat destruction. He told that this made his heart feel for them. Paothong did not know anything regarding such birds that made him think that probably others did not know much regarding them either. He found out that if people got a scope to know them, they could be motivated to save them. If a guy from Thailand can fall in love with this bird, anyone can.

Noppadol Paothong, a wildlife photographer, is scheduled talk about conservation, grouse as well as the tales behind the snaps in his book named Save the Last Dance, in a presentation all set at the University of Wyoming for next week. The book named Save the Last Dance: A Story of North American Grassland Grouse was published in the year 2012. It deals with the courtship rituals of grouse species which live in grassland habitats of North American. He is scheduled to speak on Thursday at 7 pm at UW Ag Auditorium.

Paothong, a Missouri Department of Conservation photographer, spent eleven years taking snaps of  sharp tailed grouse, lesser prairie chickens, Gunnison sage grouse and greater sage grouse. Since the courtship season for every bird species lasts only a few weeks in the spring, Noppadol could take snap only 1 – 2 species every year. In compiling snaps for the book, he toured 80000 miles through fourteen states. He spent several hours at a time sitting in blinds and waiting for the absolute right time, braving all types of types of hazardous terrain and weather.

Paothong, Thailand native, came to the United States twenty one years ago to attend college, on the recommendation of Andrew at Kerr At Architects. In the year 2001, he was working as a photojournalist on assignment to lick snaps of prairie chickens, when he developed a passion for the wildlife and bird photography. He stated that so just few people know regarding these birds.

While seeing a prairie chicken, he saw a bird which was rare, beautiful and unique. It was one of just few birds left in Missouri. They are highly threatened by their habitat destruction. He told that this made his heart feel for them. Paothong did not know anything regarding such birds that made him think that probably others did not know much regarding them either. He found out that if people got a scope to know them, they could be motivated to save them. If a guy from Thailand can fall in love with this bird, anyone can.

Comments are closed.